My first time…. making an omelet.

Finally getting back on track with the cooking-through challenge, I decided to try my hand at an omelet.  Not just any omelet but a french omelet aux fines herbes found on page 259 of the Betty Crocker Picture Cookbook.

I never attempted making an omelet before because it holds a bit of an intimidation factor for me.  I was amazed to find out it is not complicated at all!

This is how my first omelet ever turned out.

I  toasted  some Brioche on the side.

Not bad for a first try.  Now the recipe for “aux fines herbes” I was drawn to as I love anything french.  It seemed quite glamorous, even for an omelet.

I honestly did not quite care for the taste.  It was a big too “herby” for my liking, if there is such a thing.  I even admit to adding barbecue sauce to it.  (blushing)

The good thing is that I tried something new.  Won’t Happily Mr. be surprised when I whip up a ham and cheese omelet for him this weekend!

Keep or Toss?:  I will definitely keep making omelets from now on.  In fact the picture instructions for the french omelet key recipe were easy to follow.  I can’t believe I was so scared to make them before!! As for the Aux Fines Herbes part? Sadly, I must toss.  It just wasn’t to my liking.  Maybe if I added a bit of cheese to it, it would have been better. Next time!

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One basic white sauce for a variety of recipes and creamy sauces.

This key recipe I learned before the arrival of my precious Betty Crocker cookbook.  White sauce, roux, whatever you call it can be the basis for so many recipes.  My mom taught me how to make macaroni and cheese using this white sauce, which surprisingly takes about the same amount of time as opening a box of Kraft.  Here in germany where the “cream of” variety of condensed soups are not sold, I found I needed to use the white sauce in order to re-create many of my American recipes, like hamburger stroganoff, a chicken and rice casserole and my favorite cheesy potatoes.  I also use this as the basis for my southern gravy and alfredo sauce.

Since I have been cooking-through my cookbook, I find now that it was used in so many recipes during the fifties and that I can even make a short cut to white sauce and keep it on hand in the refrigerator.

This is how I make my white sauce, which also seems to be the same recipe in the cookbook.  Makes sense I guess, since I learned it from my Mom who used this cookbook too when it first came out in the fifties.

Let’s get started.

First, melt the butter over low heat.

Next, blend in the flour and seasonings cooking over low heat, stirring until mixture is smooth and bubbly.

Remove from heat to stir in milk.  Then bring to a boil for about one minute.  Here, you have to stir constantly.

Sometimes, I switch to using a whisk if there happen to be any lumps in the sauce.  When the sauce is your desired consistency, it is done.

The recipe states for the best flavor to cook for 10 minutes.  I never knew that.  It also states to use a wooden spoon, so next time I will try as Betty suggests.

The measurements for a medium sauce is 3 tbsp. butter, 3 tbsp. flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 1/8 tsp. pepper and 1 cup milk.

For the shortcut to always have the basic roux (butter paste)  on hand says to blend to a smooth paste equal amounts of soft butter and flour.  Keep in jar in the refrigerator.  I will be trying this too, it will save a lot of time for me.  When ready to use, heat to scalding the milk, stock or other liquid and seasonings. Stir constantly until mixture boils for 1 minute.  Remove from heat.

I thought it was time to share this method today, as throughout this month I will be trying out a few new recipes that require this white sauce and sharing a few of my own in the near future.

I can’t tell you how many times this basic, simple, little white sauce has saved my dinners!

If you are curious about learning more about this basic white sauce, you can find all the little hints and techniques in the sauces section of the original Betty Crocker Picture Cookbook.

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Is there really such a thing as Salad Etiquette?

Why, yes there is!

If you have been following along this month,  you  might remember  that Salad is the category as we make our way through the Cooking-Through Challenge.

In the spirit of the 1950’s housewife, I am immersing myself into many aspects of this era.  As promised, it’s time to share with you a few of my favorite questions and answers according to  Mrs. Crocker’s thoughts on Salad Etiquette.

Q. Is a salad fork always necessary? 

A.  A dinner salad may be eaten with the same fork as the main course.

Q. How should I serve a bowl of mixed salad or a platter of salad?

A.  It may be passed; but he individual serving should be easy to remove.  Or the hostess may serve it onto salad plates and pass them around the table.

Q.  Should dressing always be passed?

A.  Some salads are served without dressing so that their beauty of arrangement will not be marred; these require the passing of dressing.

Just one more…

Q.  Should one eat the salad green?

A.  Yes, it is a part of the salad and is intended to be eaten.

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Whats coming up next on the blog? Well, last night I tried creating another new dish in the salad category that doesn’t have anything to do with lettuce.  I’ll be sharing that with you friday, so make sure to stop by to find out if my husband gave it a thumbs up or not.  😉

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